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September 11, 2012
Star Entertainment


 

Bounty lashes out at Tommy Lee - Others also voice concern about demonic songs
CURTIS CAMPBELL, STAR Writer


( L - R ) Bounty Killer, Tommy Lee - File

Iconic dancehall artiste Bounty Killer has condemned the lyrics of dancehall's newest sensation Tommy Lee.

According to Bounty Killer via twitter.com, he supports Tommy Lee's relative dancehall success. However, he will not embrace the artiste for his continuous reference to demons and devil.

"Every man know a me say youths fi run the place, but nuh come chat nuh (expletive) bout freak and devil or demon. So when a man ago sing certain things, him nuh think say nobody was gonna have a problem wid him argument dem? A when since yu can just come inna dancehall and a bring een demon people freely so? How long we have we dancehall nice and pure. Mad mi mad to (expletive) some a dem too bright and no big man inna dancehall naah stand up and tell dem say dat nuh accepted. People mi fight fi dancehall wid mi life and say (expletive) career dem naah mash it up enuh," Bounty Killer tweeted.

The Alliance boss also hinted that his upcoming Sting performance could see him tackling issues of Antichrist and devil worship.

"Christmas is for Christ so nuh demon or devil cyaah win, wi a (expletive) all a dem a dead a Sting," Bounty Killer also tweeted.

When The STAR contacted Tommy Lee for a comment, the artiste said he was not into disrespecting his elders.

"Mi nuh have nuh comment pon dat enuh, a elder and mi nah disrespect him. Di youth dem just duh the right and hold up yu head. A him name Bounty and a him sey cross, angry and miserable. I have no problem with him, mi respect and love him same way, mi just a look mine and a mek sure sey mi kids dem eat," Tommy Lee said.

controversial song

The controversial song at the midst of the drama is Tommy Lee's single Uncle Demon in which the artiste proclaims himself to be a demonic character. Tommy Lee's mentor Vybz Kartel also has a song called Daddy Devil which has garnered similar backlash from the dancehall community.

Producer Skatta Burrell also took to Twitter to voice his discontent with the controversial songs.

"Cyah believe Jamaicans are inviting the devil into our blessed country. Hope when destruction start tek wi, unno nuh call pan Jah fi help," Skatta tweeted.

Alliance next generation manager Cross Cris also voiced his disgust, as he says, "This issue affects dancehall and Jamaica as a wider populace ... We cannot be glorifying demonic and satanic music. Some people use words/phrases without properly researching the meaning," he said. According to Cross Cris, they are not fighting against young artistes, but "it is the continuous glorification of satanism and demonism that is being portrayed that we are against, nothing more."

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