ONE-MINUTE READS ... News from across Jamaica

June 22, 2021
Audley Shaw (left), minister of industry, investment  and commerce, and member of parliament for  Manchester North East, and Yago Castro, managing director of Carib Cement, at the opening ceremony for the recently done Denham Farm road in Manchester.
Audley Shaw (left), minister of industry, investment and commerce, and member of parliament for Manchester North East, and Yago Castro, managing director of Carib Cement, at the opening ceremony for the recently done Denham Farm road in Manchester.

Hopewell Cemetery running out of space

With only a few vacant plots remaining in the the Hopewell Cemetery, the Hanover Municipal Corporation and the Hanover Parish Development Committee (PDC) are now in the process of identifying lands for a burying ground in the town.

Petra Vernon Foster, chairman of the PDC, said that a parcel of land, which is adjoining the cemetery, is being considered for acquisition.

The Hopewell Cemetery has been accommodating burials from the nearby community of Sandy Bay, as that community's cemetery was closed on June 1, 2010, after it ran out of space.

In the meantime, Devon Brown, councillor of the Hopewell Division, has suggested that persons consider cremation as an option.

"I know that in our culture, this method of interment is not popular; however, cremation could be the answer going forward, as we may find in the future that constructing homes for the living may compete with constructing tombs for the dead," he said.

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Hundreds of Jamaicans getting skills training

Hundreds of Jamaicans are currently being trained under the free Skills for the Future Programme by the FLOW Foundation, in partnership with the Caribbean School of Data.

The programme is being done through a memorandum of understanding between the FLOW Foundation and the Mona School of Business & Management.

Kayon Mitchell, executive director for the FLOW Foundation, stated that the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for digital literacy.

"As more businesses and schools transitioned to the digital space, it was clear that many were not prepared with the necessary skill sets or means to operate in the online space," Mitchell said.

Dr Maurice McNaughton, director of the Centre of Innovation at the Mona School of Business & Management, said that "without digital literacy and data skills, we are going to be seriously challenged to be competitive as individuals, as a society, as an economy in today's world".

The online curriculum is free for participants and self-paced, and is estimated to take students 12 weeks to complete. Each group of students is supported by a trained facilitator to ensure tht they stay on track and have the tools they need to complete the programme.

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Concrete road completed in Manchester

With a forecast from the Meteorological Service of Jamaica for 13 to 20 tropical storms, of which six to 10 could become hurricanes this season, residents of Denham Farm, Manchester, are grateful for the completion of a 600-metre-long concrete road, where there was once flooding.

The project, made possible through Carib Cement at a cost of $13 million, will be of great benefit to not only the residents who have issue with the terrain, but will allow large-scale farmers to better transport their produce.

A farmer, Phillip Bartley, said he has been in the area for approximately 21 years and to be witnessing the renovation is a welcome relief.

"The bottom of the road used to flood out, and it was in such a deplorable state for years that you will be walking on it, make a bad step and sprain you foot. Some time ago they had tried fixing it, but it never do properly, and the rain come and damage it. But this now is the right thing, easier for us farmers to travel," he said.

To date, over $20 million has been spent by Carib Cement on the construction of concrete roads in Manchester and brings the total to three. The other two roads are located in Kraal and Litchfield.

Managing Director of Carib Cement Yago Castro said he is hoping that the method of concreting roadways will be employed throughout Jamaica.

"... It's not that we can fix every single road in Jamaica, but we are trying to introduce this solution because we think it makes a lot of sense. Concrete roads are much more durable and Jamaica is a beautiful country, but is a country that is exposed to harsh weather conditions ... hopefully we don't have a hurricane this year, but having these type of pavements I think, is the right solution for the long term," he said.

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