Ranch Hill thirst for water ... Residents join line twice weekly for precious commodity

April 29, 2016
Gareth Davis Sr. From as early as 4:30 a.m. on a Tuesday and Friday, dozens of residents converged near the standpipe, which is the only one in Ranch Hill, hoping to get water before the pipe runs dry.
Gareth Davis Sr. From as early as 4:30 a.m. on a Tuesday and Friday, dozens of residents converged near the standpipe, which is the only one in Ranch Hill, hoping to get water before the pipe runs dry.
1
2

... Residents join line twice weekly for precious commodity

It is said that in Portland there is water, water almost everywhere, but it seems there is hardly a drop in Ranch Hill, Norwich.

Imagine having to wake up extra early, two days a week, so you can get drinking water. Now, consider doing this for more that a decade. If this is part of your reality, maybe you are a resident of Ranch Hill.

"This is simply unacceptable," commented Jennifer Grant a social worker, who lives at Ranch hill.

"I have been living here for almost 12 years I have never had water in my tap at home for more than five days out of each month. Over the past three years the situation has worsened, and unless we can afford to buy water for our domestic use, we simply have to join the long line at the standpipe, so as to full a few buckets," she said.

From as early as 4:30 a.m., Tuesday and Fridays, dozens of residents converges near the standpipe, the only one in Ranch Hill, hoping to catch some of the precious liquid.

For others, who often arrive between 6 and 7:30 a.m., they are forced to form a queue- with the hope that water will still be trickling for them to collect, if even a gallon.

"Persons oftentimes turn out with as many as 40 four-gallon pails to catch water," said Shalmon Pink, a security guard.

"And what is even worse is that, unless all those pails are filled, no one else is given a chance to catch as little as a pint of water. It's pure selfishness around here and there is no sympathy or courtesy shown to anyone. Is just dog eat dog," he added.

Dexter Rowland, councillor for the area, said a permanent solution is needed to assist a growing population.

"I intervened in a process to terminate the practice of having a standpipe in this area," commented Rowland.

"I feel their pain and I will be lobbying for upgrading work to be done to the water system in this area," he told THE WEEKEND STAR.

Other News Stories