Weird News

by

November 04, 2017

Weird News

She knows how to pick a winner. Kimberly Morris of Wake Forest scratched off two North Carolina lottery tickets on Monday, winning $1 million on one of the tickets and $10,000 with another.

Morris thought things were going well when she bought a ticket at a grocery store Monday afternoon and scratched off the $10,000 prize. She went to the lottery headquarters in Raleigh to claim her prize.

On the way home, she stopped and bought another ticket, and bingo! It was worth $1 million.

She chose to take the lump sum on the $1 million ticket, which was worth $417,012 after taxes.

A New Jersey couple is suing a construction company after they say they found bottles of urine, rodents and rotten food inside the walls of their newly purchased $2 million luxury condominium.

NJ.com reports the couple's holding company, Shiloh Holding, filed the suit last week after they said they discovered the urine and food during renovations at the luxury unit in Weehawken.

They are also alleging the property's windows were fraudulently advertised as hurricane-proof.

A company representative says the firm doesn't comment on pending litigation.

The couple's attorney says they are seeking up to $6 million in damages.

Police in Ohio say they're looking for a man who pulled out a gun after being told by a McDonald's drive-thru worker there were no Egg McMuffin sandwiches available.

Police say the incident occurred shortly after 3:30 a.m. Wednesday at a McDonald's in Warren, about 60 miles (97 kilometres) southeast of Cleveland.

The worker told police that two men inside the car appeared to be around 20 years old. She said the driver called her a vulgar name after pulling out the gun and then cursed at her again before driving away.

Warren police hope to identify the men using surveillance video footage.

A marketing company in Tokyo is awarding a novel perk to its non-puffing employees: an extra week's holiday for non-smokers.

The corporate planning director for Piala, Hirotaka Matsushima, said Thursday that the company began offering the six days of extra vacation to all of its 120 staff members in September.

He said the policy was installed as a benefit for non-smokers to compensate for smoking breaks taken by their colleagues. About two-thirds of the company's employees don't smoke, he said.

Overall, smoking is still quite prevalent in Japan, with almost 20 per cent of over-20-year-olds saying they smoke.

Nearly 40 per cent of men in their 30s smoke, though that's down from more than half in 2001, according to government figures.