Vegetarian eats curried goat every Christmas

December 24, 2019
Georgia Bennett is a vegetarian, but she eats goat meat once per year.
Georgia Bennett is a vegetarian, but she eats goat meat once per year.
Ransford Pitter, a butcher in the Cross Roads Market in St Andrew prepares goat meat for a customer.
Ransford Pitter, a butcher in the Cross Roads Market in St Andrew prepares goat meat for a customer.
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For the past seven years, Georgia Bennett has been a vegetarian, well except for the Yuletide season when she normally journeys to the Cross Roads Market in St Andrew to purchase pounds of fresh local mutton for Christmas dinner.

This year was no different as the vegetarian is looking forward to biting into some juicy curried goat tomorrow.

When THE STAR visited the market yesterday, Bennett was patiently seated as butcher Ransford Pitter parcelled her portion of meat.

"I just felt like I wanted to give meat a break, especially after mi hear on the news how donkey meat did a sell like hot bread," Bennett said, as she explained her vegetarian journey. "However, on Christmas day, mi always break the rule and eat mi local mutton. Mi not even know if a she (doe) or ram goat mi a buy more time, but as long as it local, mi good," she said.

Several customers

Bennett was among several customers who kept Pitter and his assistant busy yesterday. In fact, all of the butchers inside Cross Roads Market had small queues of buyers at their stands. Even with the price of $850 per pound of doe meat and $1,200 for a pound of ram meat, the butchers said that goat meat is their bestseller.

"The demand is very high. Even if persons are buying other meats, like roast beef and oxtail, they are still making sure that mutton is at the top of their list. There is a relationship between Christmas and goat meat, so everyone who eat meat usually make sure it is added to their menu," Pitter said.

So high is the demand for goat meat that another butcher, Paul Nicholas, was out of stock by noon yesterday.

"Naturally, meat price a guh go up now because a lot of people a keep dance, so dem a flock the ram goat because dem like when the soup 'renk'. After Christmas done, the price a guh get back normal because mutton nah go in high demand like one time," Nicholas said.

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