It’s like Bogle fought in vain - St Thomas residents believe Stony Gut landmark needs upgrading

October 18, 2019
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The grave of Bogle’s grandson Phillip.
The grave of Bogle’s grandson Phillip.
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Despite being the birthplace of National Hero Paul Bogle, there aren't many artefacts in Stony Gut, St Thomas.

In fact, the only things that may be eye-catching is a plaque on a monument that marks the former site of Bogle's church.

Behind the monument also lies the grave of the hero's grandson Phillip Bogle.

When THE WEEKEND STAR visited the village earlier this week, monument guard Michael Daye had just wrapped up a school tour.

Leading the news team into the garden, he stated that he would like to see more artefacts of Bogle being placed at the historical site.

"There is just not enough things of cultural interest here. When people come here they want to see the statue and even a museum. All we have to show is the monument and tell them about Deacon Bogle," he said.

The monument that bears the plaque badly needs painting. Another plaque that was donated by the BBC in memory of the hundreds of persons who died during the famous Morant Bay Rebellion was ripped out of another concrete mount close to the entrance of the historical site.

Ernis Williams, whose farm is close to the garden, said he does not believe the plaque was stolen but discarded by someone who was not pleased with the way the hero's memory was being treated.

"I don't think it was stolen or anything but that don't mean anything to St Thomas people. Look at the place, is just bare weed and bush. Paul Bogle somewhat fought in vain because we still don't get the justice he was fighting for," he said. "People would waan to come here to chill and we cook some food for them but there are no shelters here. So as rain set up and the sun get too hot, they will leave. Bogle fight so much and to see how dem a treat him like him was a nobody, hurt mi heart."

The historical site has also been without electricity for a few years, according to Daye.

Bogle was a deacon of the Baptist Church, located in Stony Gut village. It was in this village that the rebellion began.

Bogle, his brother Moses Bogle, and the people of Stony Gut walked to Spanish Town to air their grievances against the injustices and oppression faced in the parish to Governor Edward Eyre.

There was much bloodshed and many lives were lost during the rebellion in October 1865.

Hundreds of blacks were killed, while Bogle and politician George William Gordon were executed.

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